Tiger Woods, 23 million dollars to the Us IRS



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Tiger Woods, 23 million dollars to the Us IRS

As the GolfMagic site reports, Tiger Woods would have earned around $60 million in 2021. An amount that makes you dizzy when you know that the Tiger, victim of a very serious car accident fifteen months ago, has not played in any tournament during the calendar year.

These 60 million are above all the result of his fabulous contracts with the brands TaylorMade and Nike in particular…

Tiger Woods, dollars

Woods was also "offered" at the end of the year a nice envelope of 8 million dollars from the Player Impact Program established last season by the all-powerful American circuit.

A nice nest egg that inevitably and irretrievably attracts the American tax authorities. Thus, according to bookies.com, the winner of fifteen Grand Slam tournaments between 1997 and 2019 would pay the equivalent of 65,000 dollars per day, or 23.5 million dollars per year!

In general, golfers playing on the PGA Tour, and more particularly Americans, are many of the largest taxpayers in the country. Phil Mickelson is obviously one of them. The left-hander from San Diego, the oldest winner of a Major (almost 51 years old at the USPGA 2021) would have paid $ 21.6 million in taxes last year.

We understand a little better why Lefty would have approached the LIV Golf Invitational supported by Saudi Arabia and which offers this year for its launch from June 9 to 11 in England an endowment of 25 million (per tournament).

Dustin Johnson, who declared $44.5 million in 2021 (the year he didn't win a single tournament for the first time since… 2007), only kept… 27 million. What, however, to quietly end his month-end… Of the stars of sport, all disciplines combined, LeBron James remains the most punctured.

The Los Angeles Lakers basketball player would have dropped 58.98 million dollars out of a total of revenues approaching 100 million (96.5 million). The American lives in California, one of the states with the highest income tax rate in the United States.

It is also for this reason that most of the richest golfers have their main residence in Florida, the state which, unlike California, remains the least "greedy" in terms of taxes.