Harry Hall, one of new faces of the PGA Tour

To use a musical metaphor, Harry Hall's dreams are still flying at the Charles Schwab Challenge 2023

by Andrea Gussoni
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Harry Hall, one of new faces of the PGA Tour

To use a musical metaphor, Harry Hall's dreams are still flying at the Charles Schwab Challenge 2023. The Englishman, one of the new faces of the PGA Tour this season, manages to follow up on the excellent -8 of the first day and , halfway through the match at the Colonial, is in front with a score of -12.

Charles Schwab Challenge 2023, results

In second place, however, Harris English does not give up. The USA, albeit with three shots late, asserts itself for having taken the one par excellence out of the hat: the hole in one at 8.

That is enough for them to find themselves in front of the Argentine Emiliano Grillo, author of the best round of the day in -5 and overall at -8. Fourth position at -7 for Adam Schenk, Robby Shelton and the South Korean Byeong Hun An, who precede Andrew Novak, good at moving up 15 positions, and Scottie Scheffler, who remains constant.

Both the 28-year-old from Raleigh and the world number 1 are seventh at -6. Triple climb to the taste of -4 in ninth place, with the English Justin Rose who remains attached to Carson Young and Austin Eckroat. Out of action for cutting some famous names, namely Tony Finau and two other Englishmen, Tommy Fleetwood and Matt Wallace.

The PGA Tour is an organization that curates major professional golf tours in the United States. It is based in Ponte Vedra Beach, a suburb of Jacksonville, Florida. The PGA Tour became its own organization in 1968, when it split from the PGA of America, which is now primarily an association of golf professionals, such as instructors and club managers.

Tournament players first formed their own organization, the Association of Professional Golfers (APG). Later, in 1968, the players abolished the APG and agreed to operate as the PGA "Tournament Players Division", a fully autonomous division of the PGA, overseen by a new 10-member Tournament Policy Board[1]. The name then officially changed to "PGA Tour" in 1975.

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