Ludvig Aberg: "Being here dream come true"

"Ever since I was little I dreamed of being part of Team Europe, but I only became certain of it at the end of the summer. It's a dream come true."

by Andrea Gussoni
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Ludvig Aberg: "Being here dream come true"
© Richard Heathcote / Getty Images Sport

"Ever since I was little I dreamed of being part of Team Europe, but I only became certain of it at the end of the summer. It's a dream come true."

Ludvig Aberg, statements

Ludvig Aberg, a young Swedish golfer playing for Team Europe, doesn't hide his emotion ahead of the start of the Ryder Cup on Friday 29 September at the Marco Simone Golf & Country Club.

"Me among so many famous Swedish athletes like Borg and Ibrahimovic? Everything what I do is play golf, I don't think about it." The golfer, born in 1999, is famous on the circuit for his great patience: "One of the great skills I have is acceptance: I let things go as they should go, this is my way of being.

I don't get angry easily." The history of the Ryder Cup, which was held regularly from 1927 and then officially named that, goes back to 1920/21. Golf Illustrated editor James D. Harnett had the idea of forming a powerful American delegation to prepare for the 1921 British Open in St Andrews, Scotland, as this title had never been won by an American .

His magazine then launched an appeal to obtain funding for this project through donations. The concern was also brought to the attention of the PGA, which then supported it.[2] In the spring of 1921, this project took shape - a team of twelve golfers was formed that was supposed to travel to Great Britain early.

In order to ensure better preparation for the British Open, the idea of a preliminary comparison competition with British golfers came up. This event was then held on June 6, 1921, two weeks before the actual championship, in nearby Gleneagles.[4] However, since not all Americans were able to compete, the teams were then made up of 10 golfers each.

Five foursomes were played in the morning and 10 singles matches in the afternoon on the “King's Course” at the Gleneagles Hotel. The British selection clearly won this comparison with 9:3 victories in three shared games.

Although this comparison was clearly lost, the actual aim of the campaign was achieved; The American Jock Hutchison - although born in Scotland - then won the British Open in 1921.

Ludvig Aberg
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