How to make 19 fewer strokes in single round

In a remarkable turn of events, Kofstad managed to shoot 62 strokes, 10 under par, in the same course where he had struggled with 81 strokes the previous day

by Andrea Gussoni
SHARE
How to make 19 fewer strokes in single round
© Getty Images Sport - Mike Mulholland / Stringer

Golf, as Mark Twain once said, can be likened to "a beautiful pathway spoiled" or to a fairy tale day. In the Hero Indian Open, held in New Delhi and part of the DP World Tour, Norwegian golfer Espen Kofstad experienced the highs and lows characteristic of this sport within just 48 hours.

Golf, story

In a remarkable turn of events, Kofstad managed to shoot 62 strokes, 10 under par, in the same course where he had struggled with 81 strokes the previous day. The five bogeys, a double bogey, and a triple bogey on the first day, with just one birdie, transformed into a spectacular performance with nine birdies and an eagle, albeit with one bogey, creating one of the most notable turnarounds in the tournament's history.

This impressive comeback will likely ensure Kofstad continues in the Indian tournament, barring any unforeseen changes. "It's been incredible. Everything fell into place, and I made so many putts that I don't even know how many feet I covered," remarked Kofstad.

"This morning, on the practice range, I felt really confident with my game. Suddenly, the birdies started to come when I began to get a bit lucky," added the golfer, who had adjusted his travel plans to return home on Thursday but had to change them again.

The contrast between the two rounds brings to mind episodes like John Daly's in 2012 at Justin Timberlake, where he recorded 63 and 86 strokes, respectively. At the top of the tournament leaderboard is Japanese golfer Keita Nakajima, with rounds of 65 strokes each, while the best-placed Spaniard in the competition is Adrián Otaegui, who, with four holes left to play in the second round, is in the fortieth position, ten strokes behind the leader.

The rules of golf are a set of standard norms and procedures that govern how the sport of golf should be played. They are collectively written and managed by the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews, the governing body for golf worldwide, except in the United States and Mexico, which fall under the jurisdiction of the United States Golf Association.

A panel of experts composed of members from the R&A and USGA oversees and refines the rules every four years. The latest revision has been in effect since January 1, 2016. Changes to the rules of golf generally fall into two main categories: those that improve understanding and those that, in certain cases, reduce penalties to ensure fairness.

The rulebook, titled "Rules of Golf," is regularly published and also includes regulations governing amateur status. In Italy, it is the responsibility of Federgolf to oversee competitions, ensure compliance with the rules issued by the R&A, monitor that these rules are observed by clubs, associations, and their members, and manage the resulting sports justice, protecting their interests abroad.

SHARE