David F. Rook: "My golf is perfect at 83.3%"

David F. Rook was an unconventional golfer. A decent player, with a handicap of 4 or 5 on paper, but at the end of the 18 holes, his score rarely dipped below 80

by Andrea Gussoni
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David F. Rook: "My golf is perfect at 83.3%"
© Getty Images Sport - Mike Mulholland / Stringer

David F. Rook was an unconventional golfer. A decent player, with a handicap of 4 or 5 on paper, but at the end of the 18 holes, his score rarely dipped below 80; nevertheless, he played a beautiful game. He knew how to work the ball, had a comprehensive understanding of the game, and could pull off unimaginable recovery shots, but inevitably, in every round, he would make a couple of triple or quadruple bogeys that would ruin his score.

David F. Rook, statements

"My golf is perfect 83.3% of the time," David would say. Fifteen holes played around the course par, with a couple of birdies and the occasional bogey, and three holes of pure madness, where anything could happen: hooks from the tee that disappeared into uncharted areas of the forest, shanks from the middle of the fairway ending up in water where you didn't even remember there was a lake, "fat shots" from the bunker whispering out of bounds 20 or 30 meters behind the green.

David never took it to heart: he cursed in his characteristic Anglo-Saxon accent, laughed heartily at his erratic shots, and allowed us, his friends whom he regularly played with, to poke fun at him. The Rules of Golf are a set of standard rules and procedures by which the sport of golf should be played.

They are jointly written and administered by the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews, the governing body of golf throughout the world, outside of the United States and Mexico, which are the jurisdiction of the United States Golf Association.

An expert commission made up of members of the R&A and USGA oversees and refines the rules every four years. The latest revision is effective January 1, 2016. Changes to the rules of golf generally fall into two main categories: those that improve understanding and those that in certain cases reduce penalties to ensure balance.

The rule book, entitled "Rules of Golf", is published on a regular basis and also includes rules governing amateur status. In Italy it is up to Federgolf to supervise the competitions by enforcing the rules issued by the R & A, checking that these rules are observed by the Clubs, Associations and their members and managing the resulting sporting justice, protecting their interests abroad.

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