LETAS: first title for Magnusson, 49th De Martini

Anna Magnusson secured her first title on the LET Access, the second-tier women's European tour, by winning the 12th Terre Blanche Ladies Open with a score of 207 (72 67 68, -9)

by Andrea Gussoni
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LETAS: first title for Magnusson, 49th De Martini
© Getty Images Sport - Stuart Franklin / Staff

Anna Magnusson secured her first title on the LET Access, the second-tier women's European tour, by winning the 12th Terre Blanche Ladies Open with a score of 207 (72 67 68, -9). The tournament, the opening event of the 2024 tour, took place at the Golf de Terre Blanche course (par 72) in Tourrettes, France.

Erika De Martini finished 49th with a score of 226 (76 73 77, +10).

Letas, results

The 29-year-old Magnusson from Stockholm, in her 36th appearance on the LETAS, which currently consists of 14 events, climbed from second place with a round of 68 (-4, seven birdies, three bogeys) to surpass amateur French player Sara Brentcheneff, who finished second with 208 (-8) after a round of 71 (-1, three birdies, two bogeys), despite leading in the first two rounds.

In third place with 213 (-3) was English player Amy Taylor, followed by Dutch player Zhen Bontan and Ana Dawson from the Isle of Man in fourth with 214 (-2). In sixth place with 215 (-1) were French player Charlotte Liautier, Swedish player Isabell Ekstrom, and English player Billie-jo Smith.

Amateur French player Louise Uma Landgraf, defending the title, finished 17th with 218 (+2). Players who missed the cut, set at 150 (+6), included Marta Spiazzi in 60th place with 151 (+7), Alice Negroni (am) in 69th with 153 (+9), Emma Lundgren in 77th with 155 (+11), and Caterina Tatti in 85th with 158 (+14).

The winner received a prize of €6,800 from a total purse of €42,500. The tournament was won in 2022 by Lucrezia Colombotto Rosso, the only Italian to achieve the feat. The rules of golf constitute a set of standard norms and procedures that govern the playing of the sport.

They are jointly drafted and managed by the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews, the governing body for golf worldwide, except for the United States and Mexico, which fall under the jurisdiction of the United States Golf Association.

A panel of experts comprising members from both the R&A and USGA oversees and updates the rules every four years, with the latest revision in effect since January 1st, 2016. Changes to the rules of golf typically fall into two main categories: those aimed at enhancing understanding and those that, in certain cases, reduce penalties to ensure fairness. The rule book, titled "Rules of Golf," is regularly published and includes provisions governing amateur status as well.

European Tour
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