Pga Championship, fatal accident near course

The PGA Championship, also known as the US PGA Championship or USPGA outside the United States, is an annual golf tournament organized by the Professional Golfers' Association of America (PGA)

by Andrea Gussoni
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Pga Championship, fatal accident near course
© Christian Petersen/Getty Images Sport

Tragedy struck in the USA, where the second round of the PGA Championship golf tournament will begin at least an hour late. In Louisville, Kentucky, a shuttle bus traveling in a preferential lane accidentally hit and killed a man who was crossing the street near the tournament course, the Valhalla Golf Club, which is hosting the 106th edition of the Major tournament.

PGA Championship, news

The PGA Championship, also known as the US PGA Championship or USPGA outside the United States, is an annual golf tournament organized by the Professional Golfers' Association of America (PGA). It is one of the four major championships in men's golf.

Traditionally played in mid-August on the third weekend before Labor Day weekend, the PGA Championship was the final major of the golf season. However, starting in 2019, the tournament shifted to May, taking place on the weekend before Memorial Day.

This change positioned it as the second major of the season, following the Masters Tournament in April. The PGA Championship is recognized as an official money event on the PGA Tour, European Tour, and Japan Golf Tour, boasting a substantial purse, with the 100th edition in 2018 offering $11 million.

Like the other majors, winning the PGA Championship comes with significant privileges that enhance a golfer's career. Champions automatically qualify for the other three majors (Masters Tournament, U.S. Open, and The Open Championship) and The Players Championship for the next five years.

They also receive PGA Tour and European Tour membership for the following five seasons. Unlike the other majors, the PGA Championship is exclusively for professional players. Throughout its history, the PGA Championship has been hosted at various venues.

While some early sites may be less familiar, recent editions have been held at renowned courses. The PGA Championship's roots trace back to 1894 when two unofficial national championships for amateur golfers were organized at Newport Country Club in Rhode Island and Saint Andrew's Golf Club in New York.

Saint Andrew's also held an Open championship for professional golfers simultaneously. These events sparked controversy, leading to the formation of the United States Golf Association (USGA) later that year, becoming the country's first formal golf organization.

In February 1916, the Professional Golfers Association of America (PGA) was established in New York City. A month earlier, a luncheon hosted by department store owner Rodman Wanamaker at Wykagyl Country Club in New Rochelle laid the groundwork for the PGA's formation.

Wykagyl earned the nickname "The Cradle of the PGA" due to its role in these discussions. The inaugural PGA Championship took place in October 1916 at Siwanoy Country Club in Bronxville, New York, with Jim Barnes emerging as the winner.

The champion received $500, a diamond-studded gold medal, and a trophy donated by Rodman Wanamaker, a tradition that continues to this day.

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