Parkinson's patients, golf better than Tai Chi



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Parkinson's patients, golf better than Tai Chi

One study suggests that playing golf may have greater benefits for Parkinson's patients than Tai Chi. Although Chinese martial art is not officially recommended by the NHS as a treatment for the disease, day care centers and clinics advertise Tai Chi classes for Parkinson's patients.

Even Chinese martial art, as reported by the "Telegraph" is not officially recommended by the NHS as a treatment for the disease, day centers and clinics advertise Tai Chi classes for Parkinson's patients. While research in the New England Journal of Medicine found that biweekly Tai Chi training resulted in improved postural stability and walking ability for patients, another study that will be presented at the 73rd annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology next month shows that golf is also very effective in these cases.

The study involved 20 people with moderate Parkinson's disease divided into two groups; eight were randomly assigned to play golf, while 12 practiced Tai Chi. The groups underwent a 10-week study, with two one-hour lessons per week.

At the start and end of the study, the researchers tested the patients' balance, walking ability and risk of falling. In one test, participants were timed as they rose from a chair, walked 10 meters, and then sat back down.

It was finally found that golfers were 0.96 seconds faster than those who practiced Tai Chi, while no differences were reported between groups for falls or adverse events.

Parkinson's patients, statements

Study author Dr Anne-Marie Wills, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, said, 'We know that people with Parkinson's disease benefit from exercise, but not many do it.

Golf is popular, the most popular sport for people over the age of 55, and this may encourage people to try and keep it. We decided to read golf with Tai Chi in our studio because Tai Chi is the gold standard for balance and prevention of falls in people with Parkinson's "

Claire Bale, Head of Research at Parkinson's UK, explained: 'People with Parkinson's often tell us that behavior is just as important as their medications when it comes to managing their symptoms, but we know that Parkinson's is a complex condition and There is simply no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to exercise and physical activity.

" However, the researchers cautioned that although the results were "surprising", the small sample size and the fact that they were evaluated over a short period of time means that more research is needed.