Andy Roddick: 'Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic are always in the semis'


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Andy Roddick: 'Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic are always in the semis'

Ever since Wimbledon 2003, Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic have been the dominant figures at Majors, sharing 56 titles to distance themselves entirely from Pete Sampras and other rivals. One of the players from the rare list of those who have been able to steal a Major from them is Andy Roddick, lifting the crown at the US Open 2003 and still standing as the last American champion on the highest level, with small chances of seeing another one in the years to come as well.

During these days without tennis, Roddick has joined the Tennis Channel squad, speaking about various topics and praising Federer, Nadal and Djokovic and their incredible consistency over the years. Andy retired at the US Open 2012 when Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic were in the top-3 (Murray moved in front of Nadal after New York) and they are still in the top-4, resisting the age and all the younger opponents.

After the US Open 2016 when Stan Wawrinka went all the way, Roger, Rafa and Novak have conquered all 13 Majors, cementing their dominance at the most prominent tournaments in the world and extending their legacy to the level that will hardly be reached by anyone in the future.

Roddick reminded that Pete Sampras used to win a Major or two every year, honoring his compatriot but pointing out that the mentioned trio went much further, reaching at least the semi-final at Majors all the time and sharing the titles between themselves.

"We are talking about Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic and run out of superlatives and adjectives to explain how insane it is to compete at the level they have played for so long. If we look at Pete Sampras, he had a great career, winning a Major or two every year but still losing earlier sometimes. Federer, Nadal and Djokovic are in the semi-final almost every time, which is insane."