'Nick Kyrgios can play under pressure', says ATP legend



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'Nick Kyrgios can play under pressure', says ATP legend

The distance teasing between Nick Kyrgios and Bernard Tomic continues. Over the years, the two Aussies have been seen time and time again sending each other spikes and in some cases direct mentions on social media by tennis fans, who from time to time witness these disputes.

The last one in chronological order dates back to the early hours of this morning, when Kyrgios once again mocked Tomic's skills after his victory at the ITF Futures tournament in Cancun, Mexico. Upon reading the news of the Stuttgart native's triumph, Nick commented with a wry-laden "Unbelievable," complete with a smiley face: yet another act of taunting Tomic from Kyrgios.

Nick Kyrgios, cross and world tennis delight, is known for being one of the most unusual athletes on the circuit. Nick is a source of discussion not only because of his behavior on the court, but above all because of what happens to him off it.

In the last stage of his career, Kyrgios seemed to have put his non-tennis problems aside, but in the last few hours the Australian tennis player has stumbled again. In the past, Nick Kyrgios has been involved in quite heated social clashes with his compatriot Bernard Tomic.

The latter has repeatedly challenged Kyrgios on the court (and off it) and relations between the two are far from idyllic.

Rod Laver on Nick Kyrgios

Asked by the Telegraph on the sidelines of the Laver Cup which took place in London last weekend, Rod Laver spoke in particular about his compatriot Nick Kyrgios, who finally seems to have realized his immense talent.

Finalist at Wimbledon against Novak Djokovic in July, the Australian received encouragement but also some reprimands from his elder. “Kyrgios has every ability in the world, every shot you could want to do. He's probably one of the greatest servers in the game.

He's precise, he can play under pressure. I was delighted that he reached the final, but he didn't think he could win Wimbledon. In my mind, I said, 'Hey, do your best performance. You might surprise yourself. A month or two later, I said to him, ‘You can win these games, why don’t you apply yourself, man?’ I think that hit him close.

He realized he was good enough and he could do it. It's the best thing that ever happened to him. Unfortunately, he said he wanted to return to Australia and not play the Laver Cup. But he knows he can play and compete now. He must not enter the court saying to himself: "If I win three games, that's enough". Now he's like, 'Next year? Wimbledon? You will see a different player."