How does racquet-string tension affect the elbow?


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How does racquet-string tension affect the elbow?

The mechanics of our body is an extremely complex subject but, at the same time, it is very interesting. Especially if applied to individual sports like tennis. There are movements of joints, bones, muscles, and tendons that are studied in detail.

Especially when these are applied to the use of a tool such as a tennis racket. An interesting study published in the Shoulder Elbow, entitled Racquet string tension directly affects force experienced at the elbow: implications for the development of lateral epicondylitis in tennis players, gave interesting results.

Here is an abstract: "Background. Lateral epicondylitis (LE) occurs in almost half of all tennis players. Racket-string tension is considered to be an important factor influencing the development of LE. No literature yet exists that substantiates how string-tension affects force transmission to the elbow, as implicated in LE development.

We establish a quantitative relationship between string-tension and elbow loading, analyzing tennis strokes using rackets with varying string-tensions. Methods. Twenty recreational tennis players simulated backhand tennis strokes using three rackets strung at tensions of 200 N, 222 N and 245 N.

Accelerometers recorded accelerations at the elbow, wrist and racket handle. Average peak acceleration was determined to correlate string-tension with elbow loading. Results. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed when average peak acceleration at the elbow at 200 N string-tension (acceleration of 5.58 m/s(2)) was compared with that at 222 N tension (acceleration of 6.83 m/s(2)) and 245 N tension (acceleration of 7.45 m/s(2)).

The 200 N racket induced the least acceleration at the elbow. Conclusions. Although parameters determining force transmission to the elbow during a tennis stroke are complex, the present study was able to control these parameters, isolating the effect of string-tension.

Lower string-tensions transmit less force to the elbow in backhand strokes. Reducing string-tension should be considered favorably with respect to reducing the risk of developing LE." Source: Shoulder Elbow - Racquet string tension directly affects force experienced at the elbow: implications for the development of lateral epicondylitis in tennis players ALSO READ: De Minaur: Rafael Nadal is like the king in Spain