The Musculoskeletal Health Benefits of Tennis: What you need to know



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The Musculoskeletal Health Benefits of Tennis: What you need to know

Tennis, like many other sports, brings benefits to the practitioner's health: today many athletes, such as Roger Federer and Serena Willims, manage to have a very long career thanks to the care that their teams do on their body, in order to make them more elastic and stronger over time, and more resistant.

It is no coincidence that many players today express their best tennis beyond their 30-years. In the article by Sport Health, The Musculoskeletal Health Benefits of Tennis, you can read an interesting study about the benefits of tennis to the musculoskeletal system.

Here is an abstract: "BACKGROUND. The prevalence of musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions is increasing, and although current guidelines for physical activity attempt to combat this, many fail to achieve the recommended targets.

The present study sought to investigate whether regular tennis participation is more effective at enhancing MSK function than meeting the current international physical activity guidelines. Hypothesis. Tennis players will display significantly enhanced MSK function when compared with age-matched healthy active nonplayers.

STUDY DESIGN. Cross-sectional study. METHODS. Ninety participants (age range, 18-65 years) took part in this study; there were 43 tennis players (18 men, 25 women) and 47 nonplayers (26 men, 21 women). MSK function was assessed by cluster analysis of three factors: (1) electromyographic fatigability of prime movers during handgrip, knee extension, and knee flexion; (2) isometric strength in the aforementioned movements; and (3) body composition measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis.

Maximal oxygen uptake was also assessed to characterize cardiorespiratory fitness.

The results of the The Musculoskeletal Health Benefits of Tennis study

RESULTS. Tennis players displayed significantly greater upper body MSK function than nonplayers when cluster scores of body fat percentage, handgrip strength, and flexor carpi radialis fatigue were compared by analysis of covariance, using age as a covariate (tennis players, 0.33 ± 1.93 vs nonplayers, - 0.26 ± 1.66; P <0.05).

Similarly, tennis players also demonstrated greater lower extremity function in a cluster of body fat percentage, knee extension strength, and rectus femoris fatigue (tennis players, 0.17 ± 1.76 vs nonplayers, -0.16 ± 1.70; P <0.05).

CONCLUSION. The present study offers support for improved MSK functionality in tennis players when compared with age-matched healthy active nonplayers. This may be due to the hybrid high-intensity interval training nature of tennis.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE. The findings suggest tennis is an excellent activity mode to promote MSK health and should, therefore, be more frequently recommended as a viable alternative to existing physical activity guidelines."

The results of the The Musculoskeletal Health Benefits of Tennis study can help to make the practitioner understand how to have a long career like those of Roger Federer and Serena Williams.