Judges explain why they upheld Minister's decision to revoke Novak Djokovic visa



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Judges explain why they upheld Minister's decision to revoke Novak Djokovic visa

Judges of the Federal Court admitted the Novak Djokovic deportation was due to Immigration Minister Alex Hawke's inference of the situation but confirmed there was no evidence that Djokovic urged people not to be vaccinated.

Last Friday, Hawke exercised his power to cancel the visa of Djokovic for the second time. Djokovic appealed and on Sunday lost his Australia visa case. After losing his appeal, Djokovic was stripped of a chance to compete at the Australian Open and he was deported from the country.

“It was plainly open to the Minister to infer that Mr. Djokovic had chosen not to be vaccinated because he was opposed to vaccination or did not wish to be vaccinated... There was no evidence, it was submitted, that he had urged people not to be vaccinated.

Nor was there any evidence that in the past his circumstances had fostered such a sentiment in other countries," said the court's ruling, as quoted on Sportskeeda.

Australia didn't want to let Djokovic stay and risk problems

The general public was aware that Djokovic was unvaccinated and the Australian authorities thought letting the Serb stay would send a wrong message.

“It was also open to the Minister to infer that the public would view his attitude as the media had portrayed: that he was unwilling to be vaccinated," mentioned the judges. “However, it was open to infer that it was perceived by the public that Mr Djokovic was not in favour of vaccinations.

It was known or at least perceived by the public that he had chosen not to be vaccinated." Those who want to play the French Open will likely have to be vaccinated. "This will apply to everyone who is a spectator or a professional sportsperson.

And this until further notice. As far as Roland Garros is concerned, it's in May. The situation may change between now and then and we hope it'll be more favourable. So we'll see but clearly there's no exemption," said the Ministry in the statement.