Novak Djokovic: 'I will keep this gift in a special place in my home'



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Novak Djokovic: 'I will keep this gift in a special place in my home'

After the first stage, held in Belgrade over the past weekend, the Adria Tour 2020 moves to Croatia for the second round of the Balkan event: to be precise, the caravan led by Novak Djokovic will perform between today and tomorrow in Zadar, a coastal town in Dalmatia which is also very important from a historical point of view.

At the basketball game in Zadar, Novak Djokovic received a special gift from the mother of Drazen Petrovic, one of Croatian basketball's most widely recognized names who tragically passed away a few years ago.

Djokovic on Drazen Petrovic

"It was a really exciting moment.

Thank you for coming, I was moved. I will keep this gift in a special place in my home. And I hope that the racket will also serve (as a special gift)," to which Mrs Petrovic responded: "It will go directly to the Drazen museum."

Drazen Petrović died in a traffic accident at about 5:20 P.M. on Monday, June 7, 1993. On the rain-drenched Autobahn 9, he was a passenger in a car that was cut off by a semi-truck at Denkendorf near Ingolstadt in the German state of Bavaria.

According to the report of the Ingolstadt police, that afternoon a truck broke through the Autobahn median, the driver was trying to avoid a collision with a personal vehicle in his own lane and lost control of the truck, crashing through the median barrier and finally coming to a stop and blocking all three lanes of traffic going in the opposite direction.

Djokovic also said that athletes just want to move on from the pandemic and find ways to compete again. “Adria Tour’s idea was born a bit more than a month ago. We had a very short time to organize and put things together.

We had to mobilize as many people as possible, tried to understand also the regulations, the measures that allow us to hold an event. At the beginning we weren’t thinking that we would be able to have the crowd, even though that at the time we were starting talking to hold an event.

There was, I think, around 100 people outdoor events allowed with social distancing of course. And then it started slowly, slowly to move forward and improve. I was online with the tennis federation in Serbia, trying to understand how I could help and contribute to the organisation of the national tour.

We allow the low ranked players to be able to earn money and have the opportunity to compete because finally this is the most important thing: for athletes it’s how to be able to survive in tennis" - he concluded.