Toni Nadal: Rafael Nadal played 2008 Wimbledon final with his foot numb



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Toni Nadal: Rafael Nadal played 2008 Wimbledon final with his foot numb

Toni Nadal has revealed that his nephew Rafael Nadal also competed with a numb foot in the historic 2008 Wimbledon final versus Roger Federer. For two weeks straight at the French Open, Nadal was taking anti-inflammatories and injections to completely numb the pain from his foot.

Nadal was able to play out the full tournaments and win a record 22nd Grand Slam title after beating Casper Ruud in the final. In the 2008 Wimbledon final - considered by some as the greatest final in tennis history - Nadal defeated Federer in five sets to win his first title at The Championships.

“In other Slams also he played with his foot asleep. At Wimbledon 2008, he played the final against Federer with his foot numb too,” Toni Nadal said in an interview with Punto de Break. "During the [2022] Australian Open, we had a video call and he told me he couldn't move.

But, after two intense matches, he raised the level of him and got in shape”.

Nadal on how his foot was functioning for two weeks

Every six hours for two weeks straight, Nadal was taking anti-inflammatories and injections so he would be able to compete at the French Open.

“They blocked the sensory nerves at a distance," Nadal explained. "If the motor nerves are numbed, you can’t move your foot. This isn’t an exact science either, because there are days when the numbness is a bit lower.

For example, yesterday in the final, my toes went to sleep and my feel was worse, but you have to control your ankle. I continued to control it enough to be able to compete. You have control of your foot, but there is no sensation.

There may be a little more risk of twisting your ankle. The way I’m playing, with a numb foot, it doesn’t matter if there’s less feeling because I go from limping to being pain free. It can’t continue, but I was able to win the tournament because I could move and run. That wasn’t the case in Madrid or Rome”.