Rafael Nadal gets compared with Robert Downey Jr: "Rafa was larger than life"



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Rafael Nadal gets compared with Robert Downey Jr: "Rafa was larger than life"

Matthew, the brother of Julie Klam, author of the book "The Stars in Our Eyes: The Famous, the Infamous, and Why We Care Way Too Much about Them", told her sister a funny anecdote involving Rafael Nadal and actor Robert Downey Junior, who is famous for his roles in the Iron Man and Sherlock Holmes movies.

"My brother Matthew, in addition to being a terrific novelist and short-story writer, has written a fair amount of journalism. In 2007, he wrote a piece for GQ on Rafael Nadal, then the number two tennis player in the world.

A year later he interviewed Robert Downey Jr. He said walking with them out in the world were completely different experiences. In Miami, women ran through traffic to get to Rafa: They'd grab him and kiss him. They adored him!

In Los Angeles, Robert Downey Jr. and my brother had no problem going through crowds or eating sushi; people noticed Downey but left him alone. He believed it was that Rafa was larger than life–people could not resist him.

Downey was resistible, and maybe his LA fans were a little accustomed to seeing a famous actor walking among them," Julie Klam writes in her book.

What is the book where Nadal is mentioned about

According to Goodreads, here is the description of Julie Klam's book "The Stars in Our Eyes: The Famous, the Infamous, and Why We Care Way Too Much about Them": "When I was young I was convinced celebrities could save me," Julie Klam admits in The Stars in Our Eyes, her funny and personal exploration of fame and celebrity.

As she did for subjects as wide-ranging as dogs, mothers, and friendship, Klam brings her infectious curiosity and crackling wit to the topic of celebrity. As she says, 'I've always been enamored with celebrities,' be they movie stars, baseball players, TV actors, and now Internet sensations.

'They are the us we want to be.' Celebrities today have a global presence and can be, Klam writes, 'some girl on Instagram who does n*de yoga and has 3.5 million followers, a thirteen-year-old 'viner, ' and a Korean rapper who posts his videos that are viewed millions of times.'

In The Stars in Our Eyes, Klam examines this phenomenon. She delves deep into what makes someone a celebrity, explains why we care about celebrities more than ever, and uncovers the bargains they make with the public and the burdens they bear to sustain this status."