Rafael Nadal and Pau Gasol’s sick Spain: “Skating rink converted into a morgue”



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Rafael Nadal and Pau Gasol’s sick Spain: “Skating rink converted into a morgue”

Paul Gasol, the NBA veteran who joined Rafael Nadal into helping the Red Cross Responds project, is deeply concerned about Spain’s current state under the coronavirus threat. Over 120,000 of Gasol’s compatriots have been infected with COVID-19 and more than 11,000 have died so far.

Gasol was deranged by how things started to change in many lively places around his home country. However, Pau knows that the measures taken by the authorities are harsh, but he urges people to respect them because that is going to stop the coronavirus from spreading.

“A recent story from Spain really shook me. In one of the busiest parts of Madrid, there’s a shopping center called Palacio de Hielo (Ice Palace). It’s a big mall with shops and restaurants, and the main attraction is an Olympic-sized ice skating rink.

Today, though, the mall is empty, as Spaniards are under a country-wide order to remain in their homes,” said Gasol in The Players’ Tribune. “The skating rink, meanwhile, has been converted into a makeshift morgue.

Think about that: An ice-skating rink….. is now a morgue. In the last few days, Madrid announced it was converting a second building into a makeshift morgue. That’s how much life has changed in Spain in such a short time,” the 2.16 meters tall NBA player continued.

Besides public spaces transforming into something totally different from what they were meant to be, the social interactions have been limited as much as possible. “In Spain, like in Italy, family members aren’t allowed to visit their dying relatives — to say a last goodbye — for fear of spreading the virus.

Women giving birth can’t have loved ones at their bedside in the hospital. Weddings are being canceled. Burials are happening without attendees. This is a different kind of isolation,” said Pau Gasol. However, Pau Gasol counts on humans’ power of staying united during tough times and hopes that the world will not be too damaged after the pandemic ends.