'Nothing says that Roger Federer can't heal from...', says former ace



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'Nothing says that Roger Federer can't heal from...', says former ace

Swiss master Roger Federer needs a third surgery on his right knee after injuring himself again during the 2021 grass season. He underwent his first arthroscopic surgery after the 2020 Australian Open, which later resulted in complications.

Therefore, he had to undergo another arthroscopic surgery in June of the same year. While the 40-year-old has had an unprecedented career, the recent year has affected his physical health. As a result, he will be "out for many months" and will need rehab to return to the Tour again.

After his first right knee surgery, it took Federer almost 13 months to return. Therefore, at this time it is unclear how many months this time will take. Before playing the 2020 Australian Open semi-final against Novak Djokovic, Roger Federer had shown signs of struggle.

Many even thought that he would retire before the game. However, the Swiss master played but lost in straight sets 7-6, 6-4, 6-3. In the days after the match, Federer had announced that he underwent arthroscopic surgery on his right knee, which is mainly done to repair the joints.

After that, the Basel-born had suffered a setback during his initial rehab. During the Qatar Open press conference, he revealed that his legs had started to swell while he was cycling or walking, so he had to do follow-up surgery to repair the wound.

Finally, Federer returned in March 2021 and took all precautionary measures to protect his knee. However, after leaving Wimbledon 2021, he updated that he would need another season to feel better in the medium or long term.

Rosset speaks about Roger Federer

Former Olympic champion Marc Rosset believes Roger Federer's return to the tour hinges on how well his next surgery goes. Rosset reckons that Federer exceeded expectations at Wimbledon and that he still has the desire to keep playing.

"Even on one and a half legs, he makes the quarters at Wimbledon," stated Marc Rosset. "I find it rather good that Roger gives himself the means, or rather the opportunity, to consider a return to the tour. Or at least that he can play without pain.

The fact that he chose the option of having another operation suggests that he does not want to suffer. Once again, nothing says that he can't heal from his knee problems," Rosset added. "Everything will depend on the success of this new operation." The 20-time Grand Slam champion cited the need for knee surgery as the reason for his withdrawal.