Roger Federer: 'With sport science and stuff like this...'



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Roger Federer: 'With sport science and stuff like this...'

Roger Federer advanced to the sixth semifinal of the 2018 season after a thrilling 6-7, 7-6, 6-2 victory over compatriot Stan Wawrinka in two hours and 16 minutes. Both players served less than 50% in the first set, but no one could notice that in Roger's games, losing a point in each of his service games to increase pressure on the other side of the net.

Stan fended off two break point chances at 2-3 and had to pass the ultimate test in the 12th game when Roger created two set points. The younger Swiss saved them both to gain momentum before the tiebreaker, where he won all four service points with the winners.

On the other hand, Roger suffered three mini-breaks to lose the breaker 7-2 after Stan's backhand down the line. Wawrinka was still serving below 50% in the second set, but had to play alone against a break opportunity, while Roger still had to hit the ball, losing five points overall.

Stan saved a break opportunity at 5-5 with a service winner before missing the opening point of a playoff after a big cross backhand from Federer that forced a volley error from his rival. Serving for the set at 6-4, Roger sent a forehand out of the stadium, and Stan was back in the game, leveling the score at 6-6 and standing two points from the goal line.

Nonetheless, his forehand drifted at point 13, and Roger closed the set after Wawrinka's backhand error to establish a decisive after just over 100 minutes.

Federer on how science would play a big part in tennis in the future

Apart from his legendary playing style, Roger Federer is also known for his insights and analysis about tennis.

To add onto to that, he shed some light on the new challenges in the sport and the means to overcome them. During a Uniqlo’s ambassadors meet, Federer joined tennis wheelchair professionals Shingo Kunieda and Gordon Reid to discuss various aspects of the sport.

Primarily, he revealed what will be the biggest challenge in the coming times. “I don’t see a revolution per se. I just think players are going to get fitter and stronger,” Federer said. “And because of that, they are able to keep their level of play for longer.

For us, I think it’s going to be the key how you stay injury-free for a long period of time, which is going to be the challenge. But, I think with sport science and stuff like this, a lot of guys will find good ways. It’s interesting to see how many similarities we actually have (Tennis and wheelchair tennis),” the Swiss maestro concluded.