'Roger Federer preferred to go into contests as...', says former ATP ace



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'Roger Federer preferred to go into contests as...', says former ATP ace

Roger Federer will break out of the top-40 of the ATP rankings for the first time since 2000. The Swiss maestro, who has not played since Wimbledon 2021, had just risen to 26th position, although he is not expected to return to competition until early summer, probably from Wimbledon or after the Championships.

Breaking out of the top-40 of the men's rankings is expected after the Miami Open 2022. Roger has spent almost 22 years in the top-40, an incredible record that he is now about to end. On May 9, 2022 another 90 points will be taken from Madrid, on June 13, 2022 180 points from Roland Garros, on June 20, 2022 250 points from Halle and then the 600 points from Wimbledon, on July 11, 2022.

2022, when Federer will run out of points for his return to competition. The last two seasons have not been good for Roger Federer. The former world number 1 took to the track with a dropper, after having to deal with a serious injury to his right knee.

Suffice it to say that the Swiss maestro only played 13 official matches in 2021, with nine wins and four losses. A poor balance for a legend of his caliber, only partially mitigated by the quarterfinals achieved at Wimbledon.

A few weeks after the championship, the Swiss announced that he had suffered a relapse in the knee and that he had to undergo surgery for the third time. The 20-time Grand Slam champion hopes to be back on tour in late summer or early autumn, perhaps for the Laver Cup, which takes place at London's O2 Arena in late September.

Alexander Waske on King Roger

Former tennis player Alexander Waske has paid tribute to Roger Federer for his friendly disposition, asserting that he has never seen the 40-year-old act in a pompus manner in all his years on the ATP tour.

"In all my years, I have never seen Roger Federer arrogant and disrespectful towards other players. During the 2006 French Open, we were in the massage room watching a match of a player who was about to win the biggest game of his career and suddenly couldn't hit the ball," Waske said.

In a conversation with Waske, the Swiss had revealed that he preferred to go into contests as the favorite because it helped him enjoy his time on the court even more. "I once asked him, 'Roger, I often cramp up when I go into a match as the favorite.

How do you deal with that?' He said, 'I need to feel like a favorite. I always go onto the pitch with the same feeling because I know how it feels when I'm playing well.' That surprised me because no one feels the same all the time.

Every day is different. He said that the lightness on the pitch is a matter of feeling and he [simply] slips into this feeling," Waske said.