'Roger Federer’s made it this far', says former No.1



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'Roger Federer’s made it this far', says former No.1

Fred Perry was the English hero, the last British winner of Wimbledon before Andy Murray's triumph 77 years later. After World War II, the tournament had no real ruler, at least until Rod Lavar (1961,1962, 1968, 1969) and then Bjorn Borg, winner of five consecutive titles from 1976 to 1980.

Borg gave birth to a great rivalry with Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe, who respectively won the title twice (1974 and 1982) and three times (1981, 1983 and 1984). Before the First World War, Anthony Wilding was the ruler of Wimbledon for four consecutive editions (1910-1913).

After the war the lawns of Church Road saw many champions compete for the title. First Bill Tilden, then the arrival of the French, who, with René Lacoste (1925 and 1928), Henri Cochet (1927 and 1929) and Jean Borotra (1924 and 1926), dominated the London scene for six years, corresponding to which Suzanne Lenglen did it in women's singles.

Reginald and Lawrance Doherty dominated the tournament in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Reginald won the editions from 1897 to 1900, while Lawrance won from 1902 to 1906. Both won four consecutive editions of the tournament, as well as being great champions in men's doubles.

William Renshaw, winner of seven titles (1881-1886 and 1889), held the record for titles won in men's singles until the 1990s and the arrival of Pete Sampras, who equaled his record. Record that was later even surpassed by another champion in 2017, Roger Federer.

Roger has been suffering from a long-term knee injury

At a recent press meeting, former World No. 1 and tennis analyst John McEnroe expressed his admiration for Roger Federer, calling him a "living legend" "Roger Federer is a living legend.

We all know that. He’s the epitome of what you would want your kids to be when they grew up. And he’s the most beautiful player I’ve ever watched play. I idolized Laver. He’s kind of an updated Laver to me.

Twenty years, you got to look at the bright side. You had a lot of times where you got to watch this guy play and win it numerous times. We have to sort of hope that whatever he decides he’s happy with. He’s 40. He’s made it this far.

It’s amazing," McEnroe said. On the men's circuit, the Swiss has the most number of match wins at Wimbledon (105). The 20-time Grand Slam winner has been suffering from a long-term knee injury, for which he has had three surgeries since February 2020.