When Roger Federer wrote history and entered exclusive 'Club 900'



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When Roger Federer wrote history and entered exclusive 'Club 900'

Roger Federer will end his career on Friday, playing his last career match in the doubles at the Laver Cup, most likely alongside Rafael Nadal. Federer lost his place in the ATP ranking after almost 25 years in July, and he could not make a comeback after his third knee surgery following the last year's Wimbledon.

Alongside 310 weeks as world no. 1, Roger is the record holder with 968 top-10 weeks. The Swiss is the only player in the 'Club 900,' and Rafael Nadal should join him there in a couple of months. Roger's milestone 900th top-10 week came in January 2020, on the same day he toppled Steve Johnson in the Australian Open first round.

Roger claimed the 1999 Wimbledon junior title at 17 and focused on his pro career. He made steady progress through the rankings and became the top-10 contender in 2001 following his first ATP title. Federer had to wait until May 2002 to find himself in the elite group, winning the first Masters 1000 title in Hamburg and cracking the top-10 the following day.

Roger Federer became the first player with 900 weeks in the top-10 in 2020.

After minor ups and downs, Federer returned to the top-10 in October of that year. Roger claimed the first Major crown at Wimbledon 2003, and his place in the top-10 was never in doubt for many years to come!

Federer remained a part of the elite group for over 14 years before dropping out in November 2016 following a left knee injury. The Swiss took six months off and made a remarkable comeback in 2017. He conquered three Major titles between the Australian Open 2017 and 2018 and cemented his place among the elite to keep behind his closest rivals, Jimmy Connors and Rafael Nadal.

Roger has been one of the most consistent players in the past two decades, securing 20 Major titles between 2003 and 2018 and spending 310 weeks as world no. 1. The Swiss could deal with much younger rivals, finishing the 2019 season in the top-3!

Still, a knee injury ruined the last three seasons of his career, struggling since early 2020 and undergoing three surgeries. Federer played only one tournament in 2020 and still finished in the top-5 thanks to the pandemic and his points from the previous year.

Roger finally left the top-10 in October last year after 968 weeks, setting the record that Rafael Nadal is trying to catch.