Sleeping, core exercises, desire: Roger Federer reveals keys to success



by   |  VIEW 6850

Sleeping, core exercises, desire: Roger Federer reveals keys to success

How is Roger Federer able to compete at the highest level at 37 years of age? The Swiss player tried to explain the keys of his longevity that keeps impressing everyone. 'Since a few years now or many years, I have tried to look at the big picture to hopefully still be playing at a high level at this age.

So in some ways, I am not surprised I am playing as well as I am', Federer admitted. 'I think I have worked on my game moving forward, have been able to take the ball earlier, and, you know, I think I'm volleying better than I have the last 10 years.

I think I was volleying well coming up on the tour when I was younger because I was spending more time at net. I think that gave me the confidence to keep working on that, moving forward. Now because my serving is working quite well, you put those two things together and standing in on the return as well, I think has changed the dynamics a little bit.

It's all about keeping yourself in shape and staying injury-free. And motivated, I guess.' 'I'm more professional these days; whereas when I was coming up on tour I would bounce up and down for two minutes and then just walk out to the practice and do almost the same for the match', Roger added.

'These days I take more time, put in more of the core exercises, do more stretching. Sometimes I just can't wait to get off the table again honestly. It's nice not to be on there all the time. Yeah, for me, also sleeping has become quite important.

I make sure I sleep enough, as well. Because I believe it's really the sleep that gives you energy again down the road. You always have to keep searching to improve as a player, as a person anyways, but as a player, because I'm sitting in a press room for tennis right now, not like a life school.

So I feel like you always have to be on the lookout for what can inspire you. It can be music, could be kids, could be an art gallery, a theatre. Whatever it is, you can draw bits and pieces from things, from people, whatever that may be.

I definitely feel like the last sort of six, seven-year, I've been more aware of those things, whereas in the beginning it was just trying to be more comfortable on the tour, understand what the tour is about, its history, the tournaments, the travelling, how to understand that all.

After a while you know what it takes, then you can actually search in different areas.' ALSO READ: Rafael Nadal: 'Someone will replace me and Roger Federer'