Roger Federer: 'Having success depends on factors you cannot control'


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Roger Federer: 'Having success depends on factors you cannot control'

In an interview, Roger Federer explained how he managed to go through the four years and a half between July 2012 and January 2017 where he did not win a Grand Slam. "I tried to be smart", said the Swiss. "Planning the conditions for your success is possible, but the success itself depends on external factors that you cannot control.

Sometimes I was not far away from the win. And even if I did not win a Grand Slam, I had good years: in 2014 we won the Davis Cup, in 2015 I was not far away from getting the No. 1 position in the world back. Over those five years, I also changed my gamestyle to become more aggressive.

You think about all this, you look for solutions, you put them together. That entire journey was very interesting. " Federer was asked what made him defeat Rafael Nadal four times in a row in 2017. The Swiss player said: "I think these are the consequences of my racquet change dated back to three years ago.

In 2014, I switched from 90 to 98. In the beginning, I was afraid that it could influence my strengths. It took a lot of time to really use it. Now I play closer to the baseline and I am more aggressive in rallies." Asked if the four Grand Slams court speeds should be more different, Federer replied: "Yes, I am in favour of it.

Every surface should have its detail. What's good in tennis is that there are different game styles, aggressive, baseline players, clay-courters, some other is more comfortable on grass. A Grand Slam combines all those players and I love that."

The 20-time Major winner finally confessed: "Before, losing in Grand Slams was tough to me because I was trying to get the world No. 1 position back. Now I agree with myself in saying that becoming a world No. 1 will be very difficult.

I would not say it makes me happy but I accept it. That's what Stan was good at as well, he knew that if he was on a good day, he could beat them."