'Roger Federer's parents discouraged him from taking it too seriously', says magnate



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'Roger Federer's parents discouraged him from taking it too seriously', says magnate

Cold shower for Roger Federer fans. The Swiss champion during the Swiss Sports Awards ceremony on Sunday evening in Zurich, where he was voted the greatest Swiss athlete of the last 70 years with his compatriot the skier Vreni Schneider, surprised everyone by talking about his return to the field and has left many doubts.

The 39-year-old born in Basel focused on resuming his activity after almost a year of absence and two surgeries on his right knee, one in February and the other in June: "It's a race against time and let's see if we can make it.

curious to see if the starting date will really be February 8th, obviously it would help me if I could have a little more time. I was hoping to be back to 100% condition by October, but I am not yet at it. better. So it will be difficult to be ready for the Australian Open."

Bill Gates, who is the co-founder of Microsoft Corporation, backs one of the theories put forward by reporter David Epstein in his new book, "Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World"

Gates on his passion for Roger Federer

"Here’s the surprising part about Roger Federer’s greatness: As a young kid, he didn’t focus on tennis and didn’t get fancy coaching or strength training," Bill Gates wrote.

"He played a wide range of different sports, including skateboarding, swimming, ping pong, soccer and badminton. He didn’t start playing competitive tennis until he was a teenager. Even then, his parents discouraged him from taking it too seriously, delaying specialization and accumulating a breadth of different experiences.

I learned this from reading a good, myth-debunking book called Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World," Gates added. "The sports journalist David Epstein uses Roger’s experience as his opening example of the underappreciated benefits of delaying specialization and accumulating a breadth of different experiences.

'In a world that increasingly incentivizes, even demands, hyperspecialization,' he writes, 'we … need more Rogers: people who start broad and embrace diverse experiences and perspectives while they progress'"

Federer said he still has his eyes on the four Majors next year, as well as a singles gold at the Tokyo Olympics. Federer, who will ring in his 40th birthday next August, doesn’t have an Olympics gold to his name. “I hope there is still something to see from me next year.

But if that was it, that would have been an incredible ending for me at these Sports awards,” Federer said.