'Roger Federer didn’t start playing competitive tennis until...', says philanthropist



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'Roger Federer didn’t start playing competitive tennis until...', says philanthropist

During his career, Roger Federer has been struggling with great seasons but at the same time also struggling with difficult situations: in 2009 he played an extraordinary season winning his first and only Roland Garros and thus completing the victory of all the Grand Slams.

Shortly after, Roger also won the Wimbledon tournament legitimizing an extraordinary season. On the other hand, in 2016 Roger Federer was struggling with a hard injury that for some seemed to even compromise his career but in the end he was able to return and return to success again.

We are now all aware that the Swiss champion, now on the threshold of 40 years, is in the final stages of his career. In recent seasons between injuries and losses Roger has shown that he is in decline and this is perhaps the main sign that the Swiss is learning to end his career.

Roger Federer has been five years without winning Slam titles, between Wimbledon in 2012 and the Australian Open in 2017 and now there are many fans who dream of a twenty-first Grand Slam before the coveted retirement. The Swiss has made it official that he will not be present at the next Australian Open but all the fans of the tennis world can't wait to see him on the court again.

American business magnate and philanthropist Bill Gates believes the world needs more people like Swiss tennis champion Roger Federer.

Bill Gates comments on Roger Federer's greatness

"Here’s the surprising part about Roger Federer’s greatness: As a young kid, he didn’t focus on tennis and didn’t get fancy coaching or strength training," Bill Gates wrote.

"He played a wide range of different sports, including skateboarding, swimming, ping pong, soccer and badminton. He didn’t start playing competitive tennis until he was a teenager. Even then, his parents discouraged him from taking it too seriously, delaying specialization and accumulating a breadth of different experiences.

I learned this from reading a good, myth-debunking book called Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World," Gates added. "The sports journalist David Epstein uses Roger’s experience as his opening example of the underappreciated benefits of delaying specialization and accumulating a breadth of different experiences.

'In a world that increasingly incentivizes, even demands, hyperspecialization,' he writes, 'we … need more Rogers: people who start broad and embrace diverse experiences and perspectives while they progress'"

Meanwhile,Craig Tiley, CEO of Tennis Australia, has clearly said that the management will start the Slam as per schedule. More positive tests, however, could hamper those plans.