'There was also a time before Roger Federer, Nadal, Djokovic', says ATP ace



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'There was also a time before Roger Federer, Nadal, Djokovic', says ATP ace

At last year's US Open, Dominic Thiem became the first player born in the 90s to win a Grand Slam. The Austrian's race was facilitated by the absences of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal in New York, as well as by the sensational disqualification of the great favorite Novak Djokovic for an accidental hit to a line judge in the second round.

The world number 4, who had already played two finals at Roland Garros and one at the Australian Open, did not offer an exceptional performance in this early 2021. Nicolas Massu's protégé did not in fact go beyond the fourth round at Melbourne Park, where he collapsed against Grigor Dimitrov after the grueling battle with Nick Kyrgios in the previous round.

In the traditional press conference that precedes his debut in Dubai, Thiem answered the numerous questions from journalists by touching on various topics. In particular, Dominic has claimed the importance of his triumph in the Big Apple, regardless of the fact that he has not met any of the Big 3 on his path.

Dominic Thiem on the Big 3

"Nobody knows if I would have won it but well, I have the title that's all what counts," Dominic Thiem said. "And also of course, Big 3 are Big 3 (Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic).

But I mean, there was also a time before them; nobody asks if a Grand Slam title back then was worth less or more or the same as it is now. No I mean, a Grand Slam title is worth all the time the same, and there's just no need to to think about it," he added.

"Because, well, my name is there on the trophy and it always will be and doesn't really matter who I was beating there or who was there or whatever." Dominic Thiem’s foot has been a real source of trouble for the 27-year-old in the last few months.

There have been instances when Thiem had to pull out of tournaments (Paris Masters), and times when he was unable to play at his best (against Grigor Dimitrov at the Australian Open). "Yeah, of course, I mean, on hardcourt, it's a little bit worse, as, on clay," Thiem stated.

"I can slide it out. And it's, it's a way softer surface. But I mean, I'm, I have a little bit of pain there since many, many years, actually, since a very young age. And that's why it's not bothering me too much.

Sometimes it's worse, sometimes it's better," the Austrian added. "But as of now, it's doesn't look like it's gonna be a bigger issue. And I hope it's gonna stay like that."