Sergiy Stakhovsky: "I'm afraid, but I want to continue"



by   |  VIEW 4475

Sergiy Stakhovsky: "I'm afraid, but I want to continue"

Former Ukrainian tennis player Sergej Stakhovsky, who decided to enlist with his country's army to stop the Russian advance, spoke again at Italian tv show Otto e Mezzo broadcast by LA 7. On the news that the Russian army seemed to be in about to encircle the Ukrainian capital, Stakhovsky was clear: "I don't have good numbers, but we are not surrounded by the Russian army which tried to advance on its flank and then encircle Kiev but were badly pushed back and suffered many losses, armored vehicles and tanks.

Kiev is not encircled and I don't think it will be encircled anytime soon, there are still corridors going through the city and going out. The situation is that the Russians try to attack but every time they do they suffer losses of both men and vehicles.

It is a very tough situation and I don't know how it will end."

Stakhovsky is concerned with helping people in need

The former tennis player, who in his first interview on the program conducted by Lili Gruber had declared that he did not know how to use weapons, explained what his duties are: "In the meantime, I am monitoring the perimeter of the base where I am and secondly, given my status and my involvement with volunteering where I support various foundations, I have become a bit of a mediator for the many volunteers between the army and the top official, so I can help in this regard.

I can understand what the needs are and I know how to reach those in particular need, then we are trying to evacuate certain people. Who wants to leave the city, children and women. We also take care of helping and sending supplies to areas of the city or areas that are not well placed or that there are Russians in the surrounding area.

There are many things we are trying to do, people are doing their best and for this reason the situation in the city is still not bad." Stakhovsky, answering Lili Gruber's question, said he was afraid but wanted to continue: "Yes, of course I'm afraid.

Now the situation is calm but in the night some missiles could hit us and tomorrow could be another day completely. To continue? Yes, absolutely. You saw what they did in Mariupol by bombing a children's hospital."