Pablo Carreno after Montreal win: "I can't describe the emotion"



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Pablo Carreno after Montreal win: "I can't describe the emotion"

Pablo Carreno Busta, at the age of thirty-one, grabs the most prestigious title in his career on North American hard courts on the eve of Flushing Meadows, where he has already reached the semifinal on two occasions. Final success and comeback against Hubert Hurkacz was decisive.

"Finally, but I still don't believe it. I still can't describe what I am feeling. I have worked hard over the last few years to achieve such a result and I finally succeeded. I think I've been playing at an incredible level this week and I'm happy with everything I've done.

I also have to thank all my team, who in addition to helping me from a technical point of view have given me incredible support from a mental point of view. They believe in me more than I do myself."

Pablo Carreno after Montreal win: "I can't describe the emotion"

Bronze medalist at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, the Spanish tennis player obviously put the triumph in Montreal at the top of the table: "I've already won other titles, but this one has a special flavor.

I think of course it's the most important of all. This year I still hadn't achieved much, so I can say that this trophy is a turning point. Of course, it is difficult to compare it with the Olympics because the Olympics are the Olympics, they are simply different feelings."

Handling the pressure of a final of this size? No, it wasn't a problem: "I know it's not easy to play such a match, but I didn't feel any extra pressure. For example Ferrer was the world number one and he only won one tournament in this category, it's not easy.

I will have to try not to focus only on the titles, but to have fun and enjoy all the moments. From my game to the little things in life. I don't know how many years of career I have left, so I have to think about having fun."

Important points, also on the eve of the US Open and in view of the Finals: "I have to continue like this. I grew up on hard courts so it was never a problem for me to adapt to these conditions. When I moved to Barcelona at the age of 15 I started playing on clay, but I trained on hard tennis."