Andy Murray: 'I can do some damage'



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Andy Murray: 'I can do some damage'

It's 4:06am in Melbourne and the endless marathon that gave Andy Murray victory over Thanasi Kokkinakis has just ended. The Scotsman worked his ass off to reach the third round of the Australian Open and his fighting spirit is commendable.

The end time of the game, however, has upset several experts, who are convinced that the schedule of daily matches must be reformed. Among them is former world tennis star John McEnroe, a Eurosport commentator, who sided with "Sir Andy" Murray: "It doesn't happen often, but for me they should make sure it doesn't happen," McEnroe began.

"It's going to be a game that will be talked about for a long time, but it's also a game that greatly affects Andy's chances going forward in the tournament. This kind of situation has happened before and every time it has affected players.

What other sport, be it the World Cup, American football or the NBA, is played until four in the morning? It is absolutely absurd that these things happen. There should be some kind of cutoff point. After that, what is the final point that players must stop at? These things have to be fixed." From the point of view of the show, the adrenaline, the emotion generated by a match like the one played between Thanasi Kokkinakis and Andy Murray has no comparison.

The two tennis players were the architects of a literally record-breaking match at the Maragaret Court Arena. The match between "Thanos" and "Sir Andy", in fact, officially entered the podium of all matches that ended after 4 in the morning, occupying third place (the other two are Hewitt-Baghdatis at the Open of Australia in 2008 and Zverev-Brooksby in Acapulco last year).

Murray has had to make numerous sacrifices

Andy Murray has signaled his intent to keep playing tennis at the highest level. "I think obviously you never know exactly when the end is going to be. I would like to go out playing tennis like this, where I'm competing with the best players in the world in the biggest events and doing myself justice," Andy Murray said.

The two-time Olympic gold medalist firmly believes he can still cause some "damage" when he plays his best tennis. "I felt good about the way that I was playing. It's more enjoyable for me when I'm playing like that, when I'm coming into a major event and really believing that I can do some damage," the Brit said.