Carlos Alcaraz opens up about his private life: "I'm just a normal guy"

The Spaniard, in an interview with ATP website, analyzed the fundamental balance that an athlete needs between sport and private life

by Lorenzo Ciotti
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Carlos Alcaraz opens up about his private life: "I'm just a normal guy"
© Tim Goode / Stringer - Getty Images Sport

Carlos Alcaraz is breaking all kinds of records and statistics. a mix of sparkling tennis, very young age and titles have led him to be defined as the true heir of Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer. Seeing a tennis player aged just 21 win 3 Slams and become the youngest number one in history can distract you from that human factor that a player seeks to find himself and enjoy moments of pure carefreeness.

After triumphing at Roland Garros, the young Spaniard was interviewed by the official ATP website. The Spaniard talked about everyday life and the fundamental balance between sport and private life.

"It's something I'm learning. I'm 21 years old and I'm still trying to get to know myself: the things I need or don't need, how to do them or not do them. I understand that you have to find a balance between days of work and suffering and days of rest and freedom to do what you want and not feel like just a tennis player but a normal guy," he told.

Carlos Alcaraz, Roland Garros 2024
Carlos Alcaraz, Roland Garros 2024© Getty Images Sport
 

"I celebrated with my family, people who came directly from Murcia and my friends. We went to dinner together and I did everything I couldn't do during the tournament by eating what I couldn't eat during the competition. I usually pay a lot of attention, but now I let myself go a little and took my foot off the accelerator. After all the work, the sacrifices you make to win a trophy like that, you have to enjoy the success," he explained.

Carlos Alcaraz, Roland Garros 2024
Carlos Alcaraz, Roland Garros 2024© Tim Goode / Stringer - Getty Images Sport
 

Carlitos then analyzed the long journey that led him to have many doubts before taking the court in Paris due to the forearm injury.

"I'm someone who tends to cry more when he's frustrated than when he's happy. I don't cry a lot, but I did because of some injuries that forced me to miss tournaments that I really wanted to attend. Mentally it was distressing. I use my right arm for everything and knowing that maybe I wouldn't recover 100% made me suffer. In Madrid my arm bothered me again in the fourth match and I had to miss Rome. We went through several checks to get here in the best shape, but my mind kept asking questions. I wasn't sure how my arm would react in a Slam with best-of-five sets. It was tough, but I felt better shift after shift. It was not the time to be afraid and I trusted all the work done and forgot about the rest," analyzed the young Spaniard.

Carlos Alcaraz
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