Andy Murray: 'That’s usually been a strength of mine'

Former No.1 Andy Murray turned 37 last Wednesday

by Simone Brugnoli
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Andy Murray: 'That’s usually been a strength of mine'
© Dan Istitene / Staff Getty Images Sport

Andy Murray turned 37 last Wednesday, a player who is in the final stretch of his professional career, but who continues to live his profession with enormous passion, demonstrating his desire to continue playing at the highest level.

Recently, the British player surprised by being seen with a new racket and a different brand after 20 years using Head Radical, a tennis player who has been trying out the Yonex Ezone since last week when he played the ATP Challenger Tour 175 in Bordeaux (France).

Andy Murray
Andy Murray© Dan Istitene / Staff Getty Images Sport
 

“I have played with the same racket for 20 years and in that time things change. The game has changed. I have also used the same strings in all this time,” explained Murray.

After his defeat in the third round of Miami, where he suffered a serious ankle injury, the Scotsman caused a stir in a sports store in the city of Florida by buying a large amount of material, among his purchases were ten rackets, a scale and lead.

The recovery time was more than made the most of by the Dunblane native, who set to work looking for a new work tool. “When I lost in Miami, I went to a sports shop and bought about 10 rackets.

A scale to weigh rackets, check the balance and the Swing Weight. I bought lead tape,” detailed the three-time Grand Slam champion, in words shared by the ATP.

Andy Murray disappointed expectations

Andy Murray has began his grass court season with a straight sets defeat against Marcos Giron. “I’ve been struggling with breaking serve. I’ve not broken for a few matches and that’s usually been a strength of mine,” explained Murray. ”On a quick surface like grass, the sets are tight. When your chances come you have to be clinical – he was and I wasn’t.”

Andy Murray
Andy Murray© Brennan Asplen / Stringer Getty Images Sport
 

Murray explained how the evolution of the game and the change in his game due to age has led him to work a stroke over the top of the rest in order to compete.

"The serve is essential going forward. When I was much younger and could move around the court better, I had the tools to win most points from the baseline because of my fitness.

Andy Murray
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