Will the US Open be the last Slam standing?


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Will the US Open be the last Slam standing?

It was the postponement of the French Open and then later Wimbledon being struck out that most became doubtful of the tennis season. The announcement of the clay and grass majors not being played this year, the tennis community would only use the words 'sad', 'devastated', 'depressed', to convey their feelings of their absence.

"I don't think 2020 is possible. There will be no more tennis..." Emilio Sanchez, brother of former no. 1 Arantxa Sanchez Vicario said concerning the disruption to tennis tournaments from the COVID-19 Pandemic. He had every right to feel that way as the season started taking a nasty turn with the start of the Indian Wells cancellation.

The tour had already been rough and raw from the beginning when the Australian Open was infiltrated by bushfires doubting if the tournament would be able to continue. No one would ever believe that it would be a virus outbreak next to cut through the tour.

The domino effect was inevitable as one event after another fell upon uncertain epidemics. Masks, protective clothing and more places wanted for the infirmed were in dire necessities. It was the NYC emergency management office that was given the acceptance to build a 350-bed facility at the National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows to house the overload of patients in city hospitals.

Understood, that the beds would be for those not stricken with the COVID-19 illness but the underlying consideration may change as the need for space would continue. Chris Widmaier, the spokesperson for the project remarked that "We're there to do whatever the city and state needs."

The Louis Armstrong Stadium will house the temporary medical facility as well as produce 25,000 meal packages for the first responders connected with the coronavirus community. It is extremely warranted and that the additional beds will help in saving patients' lives.

The U.S. Open is still scheduled to start on August 24th with the qualifying rounds. There is so much depending on the Flushing event happening as it would be a time for Canada's Bianca Andreescu to defend her title as she'd win last year over Serena Williams in straight sets.

The Canadian has been out since October with a knee injury and missed out on defending her Indian Wells title when it was cancelled due to the pandemic. Spain's Rafael Nadal also would be ready to defend his men's title after a 5-set win and title last year over Russia's Daniil Medvedev.

Many have become discouraged over the abbreviated tennis schedule and wonder even if the tour can continue after it was proposed to start on June 8, now an extension of July 13th. Some fans weren't hesitant to express their feelings on the 350-bed medical facility being constructed at the National Tennis Center.

"This is April, will the Open be cleared away and sanitized by August?", a fan asked. There was another who felt doubtful but realistic saying "Hopefully this virus will have subsided by then. If not then what?" The image of the Open with the greeters and aisles of shops and food courts have become tarnished when a hospital setting impeded on the site.

"Why the Open?" another disgusted fan would say as they pulled the mask down off their face on the street of Manhattan to emphasize their feelings. Everyone is trying to be hopeful as Simona Halep felt relieved that she was able to win her Wimbledon title and frame her victory racket on her wall at home, now that Wimbledon 2020 has just been cancelled.

She'd smile and give her take on the entire matter saying "Take care, stay home and be positive. Everything is going to be good."