TRUST YOUR PREPARATION



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TRUST YOUR PREPARATION

Better to be determined than to be right, because if we are undecided or have doubts, our body will not know what to do. To learn to be decisive, we need to understand the importance of routine. A routine is an action (or a series of actions) that we perform on a regular basis for a precise and specific purpose that we have control over.

It can be, for example, the repetition of a certain shot, such as the serve. The constant conscious practice of a certain routine will lead us towards the unconscious habit of success. And after having structured and implemented a certain routine with regularity, in time we will be able to get it out from our heads onto actuality.

During a match, we must turn off the analytical mind and switch from thinking mode to trust mode. We cannot think and act at the same time. If we have any doubts, the body won't know what to do. If we have practiced something enough, the body will remember it and will do it automatically.

We must trust our preparation and our body, staying in the present moment as much as possible. Being able to practice any activity while always remaining in the present moment builds the pinnacle of any performance. This is for a very simple reason: in the present there is no anxiety or fear.

Pressure is due to fear for the future and memories of past failures. One of the keys to making the most of our abilities is to learn to recognize when the mind is no longer in the present and bring it back to us. We must learn from the past, and prepare for the future, but act in the present.

When crucial moments come, one must be able to isolate oneself completely from the rest of everyday life and put on the “stage costume”. Many professional tennis players like to wear sunglasses, headphones and listen to music to isolate themselves from the outside world.

Many enter the court early and walk around it. Everyone can have their own ritual; the important thing is to know how to turn that switch on and off. Great athletes seek balance in their lives. On matchdays they find their inner warrior, they know how to turn it on and, when the match is over, how to turn it off. Because unplugging and recharging is also essential.